Requirement that the means of transport, warehousing and storage of quick-frozen foodstuffs shall be fitted with suitable recording instruments to monitor, at frequent and regular intervals, the air temperature to which the quick-frozen foodstuffs are subjected.

Article 2.1 European Council QFF legislation
 

The Quick-Frozen Foodstuffs (QFF) Regulations first came in 1990. These include detailed mandatory temperature monitoring and measurement requirements. The regulations apply to products labelled as ‘quick-frozen’, however this does not include ice cream or products that are not intended for human consumption.

The term ‘quick-frozen’ is more commonly referred to as ‘deep-frozen’. This term can be applied to all foodstuffs held at a temperature below -18C. These regulations are concerned with product temperatures and not air temperatures. However, the monitoring of air temperatures, as mentioned in previous sections, could be instrumental in establishing proof of ‘due diligence’ in the event of prosecution.

In 2007 the European Council updated legislation regarding the transportation of Quick-Frozen Foodstuffs, incorporating EC 37/2005. This regulatory statement encompasses EN 12830,
EN 13845, EN 13486, as well as being based upon Council Directive 89/108/EEC and Commission Directive 92/1/EEC.

This legislation refers to all aspects of the cold chain. It demands that Businesses keep all relevant documents showing their instruments meet the relevant European standards. Also, Businesses must date temperature recordings and store these for at least one year or longer, depending on the nature and shelf-life of the QFF.

Article 2.1 states, “Requirement that the means of transport, warehousing and storage of quick-frozen foodstuffs shall be fitted with suitable recording instruments to monitor, at frequent and regular intervals, the air temperature to which the quick-frozen foodstuffs are subjected.”

Article 2.2 states, ” Requirement that all measuring instruments described in Article 2.1 of Regulation 37/2005 shall comply with EN 12830, EN 13485 and EN 13486 standards.”, as well as identifying, ” (The) requirement that food operators keep all relevant documents verifying that the measuring instruments conform to the relevant EN standard.”

The correct application of temperature monitoring can promise a reduction in food spoilage, as well as ensuring regulatory compliance.